Learning Zone
Learning Zone
Grammar

Adjective – order in a sentence & various constructions

Level: B2

ADJECTIVES ORDER IN A SENTENCE

When two, three or (rarely) four adjectives stand before a noun, it is important to put them in the correct order.

Rule number 1:

At first, an adjective expressing an opinion, then adjective expressing the fact:

opinion: fact: noun:
a nice
a wonderful
a delicious
stupid
velvet
skiing
Chinese
young
dress
holiday
meal
men

Rule number 2:

In case of adjectives expressing the fact we place them in the following order:

size/ age/ shape/ colour/ origin/ material/ purpose/ noun

a tall young lady an old Japanese car red silk evening dress

COMPOUND ADJECTIVES

Except for simple adjectives, there are also compound adjectives, created according to the following schemes: 

adjectives + noun + ed adjectives + -ing form
dark-haired
big-hearted
good-looking
easy-going
adjective + past participle noun + past participle
low-paid
newborn
home-made
suntanned
preposition + past participle preposition + noun
outdated
overcast
outdoor
oversize

ADJECTIVES AFTER VERBS

Adjectives are words describing nouns, and because of that, they usually appear before nouns in sentences:

You’ve got a lovely tie.
She lives in an old house.

Words describing verbs are called adverbs. They appear after verbs.

He drives carefully.
They speak English quite well.

There is a group of verbs in which it is possible to use an adjective after a verb!

State verbs:

opinion noun
feel I feel exhausted.
taste This wine tastes really good.
sound You sounded happy when you spoke.
smell Something smells good.
look You look tired. Have you had a hard day?

Verbs:

opinion noun
be It’s hot today.
get He’s getting old.
become She became fat.
seem She seems very nice.

CONSTRUCTION OF SENCE WITH ADJECTIVE

THE + ADJECTIVES

Some of the adjectives preceded by article the function as a noun and expressed a group of people:

status: age: health:
the rich
the poor
the unemployed
the young
the old
the middle-aged
the deaf
the blind
the disabled

Only the rich can afford this car.
The young like to eat out.
This programme is for the deaf.

THE SOONER, THE BETTER 

Construction the…, the… is expressed by way of the + comparative adjective… the + comparative adjective.

The sooner the better.
The more she got, the more she wanted.
The longer she stayed there, the more she missed her family.

© 2019 engxam. All rights reserved.