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Learning Zone
Grammar

How to use “some, any” & “much, many”

Level: A1, A2

SOME & ANY

“Some” and “any” appears before uncountable nouns and countable in the plural.

There’s some milk in the fridge.
Is there any sugar left?
I need some new clothes.

We can use “some” or “any” when the quantity is not being specified.

SOME

“Some” appears in affirmative sentences:

There are some socks on the table.
I bought some potatoes.

Sometimes as an exception some” may be used in questions – however, only when the affirmative answer is predicted.

Did you buy any mineral water?
(We don’t know the answer)
Did you buy some mineral water?
(We expect an answer)

This type of use some” appear mostly in offers and requests:

Would you like some tea?
Could you buy some wrapping paper?

ANY

“Any” appears in questions (except for situations described in the previous point):

Have you got any friends in Canada?
Are there any questions?

Sometimes “any” may also appear in the affirmative sentences:

You can come any time you want.
Pick any card.

SOMETHING, ANYTHING…

“Some” appears mainly in affirmative sentences, whereas “any” in questions and negative sentences:

SOME/ ANY
somebody/ someone Someone wants to speak to you, Mr Martin.
something There’s something wrong with my computer.
somewhere He lives somewhere in Kent.
anybody/ anyone Is there anybody here?
anything Anything else, sir?
anywhere Did you go anywhere last summer?
I can’t find it anywhere.

MUCH, MANY, A FEW, A LITTLE

MUCH & MANY

“Much” and “many” refer to a greater quantity.
“Much” appears before uncountable nouns, “many” describe countable nouns:

I haven’t got much time. My train leaves in 15 minutes.
Many women were waiting to see a famous actor.

A LITTLE & A FEW

“A little” and “a few” refer to little quantity.
“A little” appears before uncountable nouns, “a few” describe countable nouns:

Add a little salt to the salad.
A few members of the family leave their hometown each year.

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